Engineers

If you are interested in becoming an officer in the Commissioned Corps of the U.S. Public Health Service, please note that applications for specific professions are accepted based on the current needs of the Corps. Please visit our How to Apply page for updates on which professions are currently being accepted.



Being an engineer officer in the U.S. Public Health Service (USPHS) Commissioned Corps means you're serving on the front lines of public health. Whether it is designing and constructing water and sewage systems for underserved populations, evaluating medical devices and electronic products, responding to natural disasters and other emergencies, conducting workplace safety research, managing environmental health risks, overseeing the construction of health care and research complexes, or designing healthy buildings, you can choose to serve your country in a wide variety of specializations, including chemical, electrical, mechanical, civil, biomedical, computer, and environmental engineering disciplines. As part of a national team of committed health care professionals, you’ll enjoy leadership opportunities, excellent benefits, and work/life balance, all while improving the health of our Nation.

“The U.S. Public Health Service Engineer Category is better trained and more capable than ever to work and respond to the public health needs of our generation. We are up to the challenge and stand ready.”

Rear Admiral Randall J.F Gardner
Chief Engineer Officer,
U.S. Public Health Service Commissioned Corps

Salary and Benefits

For the most part, Commissioned Corps officers enjoy the same benefits as their counterparts in their sister uniform services. Among the many benefits officers receive are:

  • Competitive starting pay that increases with promotions and years of service
  • Loan repayment potential
  • Health care and dental care for officers at no cost
  • Low-cost health care and dental care for your family
  • Healthcare benefits continue during retirement
  • Low-cost group life insurance
  • Thirty days of paid vacation per year – beginning the first year
  • Paid sick leave, maternity leave, and Federal holidays
  • Retirement plan with benefits elegibility beginning after 20 years of service
  • Thrift Savings Plan (retirement saving and investment plan similar to 401(k))

Page Last Modified on 2/19/2014